The Top Secret Museum Only CIA Spies Are Allowed To Visit

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May 21, 2014 1:16pm PST

The idea of a secret museum where only spies are allowed sounds like something out of a movie, but this is the real deal, folks. Unless you’re an employee of the CIA, you will never be allowed to enter into this top secret museum located in Langley, Virginia. But luckily for you, we’ve got some pretty sweet pictures of the artifacts contained within it’s walls for your viewing pleasure.

The CIA Museum is tucked away inside of the George Bush Center for Intelligence. Dubbed the ‘coolest museum you will never see’, it houses over 70 years worth of paraphernalia. Below are some of it’s treasures.

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The spy agency dates all the way back to World War II. The museum dedicated to it was founded in the early 1990’s and is comprised of five unique exhibits.

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The AK-47 found next to the body of Osama Bin Laden after the raid on his compound in Abbotabad, Pakistan in May, 2011.

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A model of Osama Bin Laden’s home used by the CIA to plan the attack which culminated in his death.

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Rare photo of Osama Bin Laden with a Pakistani journalist.

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An al-Qaeda training manual recovered by U.S. intelligence officers in Afghanistan in 2001.

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Richard Helms, an officer with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), penned this letter to his son on a sheet of Adolf Hitler’s personal stationary in 1945, just after the war ended.

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The Enigma. Used by the Germans during WWII, it would send secret messages using nearly unbreakable code. 

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This unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) named ‘Charlie’ was used by the CIA to study aquatic robotic technology.

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An early drone disguised as a flying insect.

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The semi-submersible. Made of wood and aluminum, it’s construction made sonar or radar detection unlikely.

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Seismic Intrusion Detection Devices used during the Cold War. Designed to blend in with the terrain, they were able to detect movement up to 900 feet away.

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This Dead Drop Spike made communication between agents and their handlers more secure. It’s risky to communicate directly, and this tool eliminated that risk. Hollow on the inside, it could house messages and then be pressed into the ground to later be picked up by the recipient of the message at a pre-disclosed location.

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This tiny camera was small enough and light enough to be carried by a pigeon. Early intelligence collection would go unnoticed as the birds were incredibly common.

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So, what do you think of this top secret spy museum with all of it’s hidden gems? Let us know in the comments section!

H/T: Tell Me Now

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