Officer Illegally Disarms Veteran And Then Arrests Him

AUTHOR

November 21, 2013 4:06pm PST

In a sorry excuse for police officers over stepping their bounds, a video has been released and is going viral.

The man’s camera, which turned on after the initial incident, was the only form of visual evidence offered on the situation.

According to C.J. Grisham, an Iraq veteran, police officers illegally disarmed and detained him. Grisham reported that Officer Steven Ermis had grabbed his gun and went to unlatch it from the sling in effort to disarm him.

New dash cam footage has been released that shows Grisham, the decorated veteran, was not lying.

The video begins when Ermis pulls up in his squad car, flagging the father and son down, asking, “What are we doing?”

FirefoxScreenSnapz072

Ermis then physically grabs Grisham’s AR-15, inspecting it.  In a moment of poor thought process, the officer then attempts to take the man’s rifle off of his sling.

Grabbing the butt of the rifle, Grisham demands, “Don’t disarm me.”  In response to the veteran grabbing the rifle, the officer draws his weapon defending himself from the situation he created.

After being slammed on the police car, Grisham notified the officer that he was illegally disarming and detaining him, and that he did not consent to any searches.

Having called for backup, the officer’s sergeant arrives at the scene where in a disgusting abuse of authority, then tells Grisham that the officer, “had the right to disarm,” him — a bold faced lie.

FirefoxScreenSnapz074

In another lie, the arresting officer claimed that he told Grisham that “I was going to take the gun,” if effort to seem in the right.

The officer also told Grisham that he was detaining him until he made sure he had the right to carry the gun –Grisham was not allowed to leave after but was instead, arrested.

“In Texas, it is legal to open carry long guns, such as a rifle. Grisham has maintained from the beginning that he was illegally detained and disarmed without consent or notification.”

Despite this fact, the veteran was still charged with, “interference with duties of a public servant” and ordered to pay a $2,000 fine, a step down from resisting arrest.

Grisham plans to appeal the ruling.

So, was this the veteran’s, or the officer’s fault?

comments

You must login in order to leave a comment.